AngelList Has a Minimum Wage Problem

CM30
4 min readJul 14, 2020

In this day and age, job listing sites are a dime a dozen. From Monster to Indeed, LinkedIn to Reed, the internet is filled with places where would be job hunters can apply for the role of their dreams.

Another one of these examples is Angel.co. It’s a bit different from your typical job hunting site, since its a startup focused one that tries to put startup founders in contact with both employees and venture capitalists. It’s a huge deal in Silicon Valley, and one which is often posted about on Hacker News.

But the site also has a dark side, and it’s one that does a real disservice to its users. One which allows or even encourages companies to exploit them with impunity.

And that’s accepting job listings which pay far below what’s reasonable for the area or field.

For instance, in London you see jobs listed which pay less than £20,000 a year. Or just above it, at around £21–25,000 a year.

Of course, the USA side and the use of the euro symbol shows another issue, namely no attempt to verify the job is actually in the location the listing says it is

That’s ridiculous. It’s basically impossible to live on that kind of wage in that city, and it means anyone unlucky enough to be working for it is going to need to either share a flat with 20 others or be independently wealthy outside of work.

And it’s a situation that’s virtually endemic across all writing and social media related categories. Every writing and social media job I’ve seen on the site is either underpaid to the point of embarassing, or flat out below the minimum wage for the area.

In fact, some of them are so bad that people would literally need a trust fund to survive on them. Like this one, which offers a job for $10–25K a year in San Francisco:

Yeah, you read that right. San Francisco. As in, that place near Silicon Valley where housing prices are so ridiculous that workers are sleeping in their cars or traveling from miles around.

Where Google’s insane software engineer wages aren’t enough to buy a house with.

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CM30

Gamer, writer and journalist working on Gaming Reinvented.